Getting beyond the divide

We can't divorce half of the country, so how do we move forward — together?

Political polarization is the biggest issue facing our country right now, threatening civil war between groups and even families. A recent Stanford study concludes current “political animosity (even) exceeds racial hostility.”

The time has passed where the majority can rule. One side can no longer win by “strong-arming” the other. Not only does movement on issues get gridlocked in our legislative process, but when a partisan action does manage to take place, roughly one-half of the country then feels miserable, angry and unheard. Ironically enough, current events are asking us to resurrect some of the best ideas of the '60s (where the current left was born): “we are all one,” unity, love for our fellow (wo)men, the Golden Rule. After all, is it OK to hate those we disagree with? Or is there a better way?

We need to come up with new solutions to old problems — together, using the best thinking from both sides.

Join us at our upcoming free talk, “How Do We Get Beyond Left v. Right?” from 3-5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at the Medford library, and 3-5 p.m. Saturday, Sep. 23 at the Ashland library. TheWeeklyTalk.com.

Marla Estes

Ashland

OLLI serves up KSKQ

OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, https://inside.sou.edu/olli) began its fall term this week, offering approximately 100 courses in the 10-week session. There’s something for everyone, and I’ve enrolled in a five-session class featuring KSKQ (89.5 FM), the valley’s volunteer-powered, listener-supported, independent community radio station.

Long a fan of stations residing in the lower end of the FM dial, I’ve found that KSKQ doesn’t disappoint. More than 60 volunteers serve the station as programmers and/or behind the scenes to keep KSKQ on the air. Their listening area ranges from Weed, California, all the way north to Rogue River, thanks to a good antenna and the recently installed translator (94.1 FM) serving the greater Medford area.

Over 1,000 listener-members contribute annually to keep their charming variety of programs on the air, 24/7. KSKQ is yet one more gem in the wildly diverse offerings to residents of the Rogue Valley. It would be unacceptable to lose their alternative voice, and I’m honored to be a contributor. You, too, can make a difference by tuning in and/or visiting their website at www.kskq.org to check out their fascinating variety of programs. Even better, click the “Donate” button. You won’t be disappointed.

Nick Viani

Ashland