Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University and an internationally known physicist and author, will take participants on a pair of intellectual adventures when he offers public lectures Wednesday and Thursday nights at Southern Oregon University.

Wednesday’s talk, “Journey to the Beginning of Time,” will address what Krauss describes as once-inaccessible metaphysical questions about how the universe began, how it will end, whether we’re alone in the universe and whether other universes exist. Those questions have come nearer to the reach of scientists in the past couple decades, he says. The lecture will be at 7 p.m. in the Rogue River Room of the Stevenson Union, with overflow space in the Stevenson Union Arena.

Thursday’s lecture, “The Greatest Story Ever Told … So Far,” will cover the real story of our journey to understand the universe — from the work of Plato to the discovery of the Higgs Boson. Krauss calls it “a tale ripe with drama and surprise,” and he will discuss how the most recent scientific discoveries may affect our fundamental understanding and the future of our world. The talk will begin at 7 p.m. in Room 151 of the Science Building, with overflow space across campus at the Meese Auditorium in the Center for the Visual Arts.

Both lectures are free and open to the public. The presentations are part of the SOU campus theme for Fall Term, Shapes of Curiosity.

Krauss received a doctoral degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a Foundation Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Physics Department at ASU, and has won several international awards for both his research and his efforts to improve the public understanding of science.

He is the author of 10 books, including New York Times bestsellers “The Physics of Star Trek” and “A Universe from Nothing.” He also appears in the Werner Herzog films “Salt and Fire” and “Lo and Behold.”