It's impossible to read Nancy Pearl's "Book Lust To Go," a listing of books about places all around the globe, without a pad of Post-It notes at your side.

It's impossible to read Nancy Pearl's "Book Lust To Go," a listing of books about places all around the globe, without a pad of Post-It notes at your side.

That's because you'll constantly be flagging books you want to read, whether they're about Arctic exploration or the search for a lost tribe of Israel in Zimbabwe. Pearl's book is available in the new books section by the Ashland library checkout area. Here's just a sampling of some of Pearl's intriguing selections.

Dean King's "Skeletons on the Zahara: A True Story of Survival" tells how 12 American sailors shipwrecked on the African coast were enslaved by a traveling Bedouin tribe. The year was 1815, the same time that Africans were being captured and shipped to America to work as slaves. Western journalist Ilija Trojanow recounts going on the Hajj in "Mumbai to Mecca: A Pilgrimage to the Holy Sites of Islam." American nanny Marjorie Leet Ford tells of her struggles to understand Britishisms and English etiquette in "Do Try to Speak as We Do." Sharyn McCrumb has written a series of books, including the "The Ballad of Frankie Silver," based on Appalachian ballads. "The Marsh Arabs" is Wilfred Thesinger's account of living with a group of Iraqis in the 1950s. Their way of life was later destroyed by Saddam Hussein, who drained their marshes as retribution for a failed coup. You can visit Australia via Tim Flannery's "Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist and a Search for the World's Most Extraordinary Creature." Travel down the Colorado with Edward Dolnick's "Down the Great Unknown: John Wesley Powell's 1869 Journey of Discovery and Tragedy Through the Grand Canyon." Potential tragedy ends up as salvation in Borneo in Judith Heimann's "The Airmen and the Headhunters: A True Story of Lost Soldiers, Heroic Tribesmen, and the Unlikeliest Rescue of World War II." Peter Allison humorously tells how he tries to keep his human charges under control in "Whatever You Do, Don't Run: True Tales of a Botswana Safari Guide." J. Maarten Troost's book title tells it all — "Lost on Planet China: The Strange and True Story of One Man's Attempt to Understand the World's Most Mystifying Nation, Or How He Became Comfortable Eating Live Squid." John Harlin III follows in his mountain-climbing father's footsteps in "The Eiger Obsession: Facing the Mountain That Killed My Father." Pearl recommends several books on hiking the Canada-to-Mexico Pacific Crest Trail, including Dan White's "The Cactus Eaters: How I Lost My Mind — and Almost Found Myself — on the Pacific Crest Trail." William Dalrymple chronicles how he traced Marco Polo's footsteps, interweaving that explorer's observations with his own, in "In Xanadu: A Quest." For an unusual view of Japan, try Jake Adelstein's "Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan." Christina Thompson's memoir, "Come On Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All: A New Zealand Story," explores the culture clash between Westerners and the Maori. Robert Kull did his doctoral dissertation on the effects of deep wilderness solitude on humans and wrote "Solitude: Seeking Wilderness in Extremes: A Year Alone in the Patagonia Wilderness." Also set in Patagonia, Nick Reding's "The Last Cowboys at the End of the World: The Story of the Gauchos of Patagonia" brings what seems like a lost livelihood to life. Learn about Mexican runners in the Sierra Madre in Christopher McDougall's "Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen." Judy Corbett and her partner bought and restored the Gwydir Castle in Wales, and recorded that endeavor in "Castles in the Air: The Restoration Adventures of Two Young Optimists and a Crumbling Old Mansion."

Reach reporter Vickie Aldous at 541-479-8199 or vlaldous@yahoo.com.