The City of Guanajuato, Mexico, unveiled a plaque Thursday honoring Graciela "Seņora Chela" Tapp-Kocks for her contribution to the Sister City ties between Guanajuato and Ashland.

Guanajuato, Mexico — The City of Guanajuato, Mexico, unveiled a plaque Thursday honoring Graciela "Señora Chela" Tapp-Kocks for her contribution to the Sister City ties between Guanajuato and Ashland.

Speaking at a ceremony attended by dozens of Guanajuato officials and citizens, Mayor Nicéforo Guerrero Reynoso said the plaque recognized "Señora Chela's constant, daily efforts and tenacity in fortifying the strong ties between Ashland Guanajuato." Noting times when the Sister City relationship seemed to falter, the mayor said "Señora Chela's consistency kept the ship afloat and made the Sister City relationship a reality."

The plaque was attached to the Paseo Ashland obelisk on the old railroad station platform near the city's historic district. The tribute was first proposed by Councilman Francisco Licea and unanimously approved by the Council.

Tapp-Kocks said she was receiving the recognition on behalf of all participants in the Sister City relationship, which she helped found 42 year ago.

She said everyone in Ashland knows something about Guanajuato, and she promised "that in the future there will not be a single Guanajuato citizen who does not know something about its Sister City (of Ashland)."

Mayor Guerreo Reynoso said Guanajuato "hopes that everyone in Ashland receives the homage to Señora Chela on their behalf, and that we continue this perpetual relationship."

The Ashland-Guanajuato connection is part of the Sister City program envisioned by President Dwight Eisenhower after World War II as a people-to-people program intended to further world peace.