House Republicans stepped up pressure on National Public Radio on Wednesday at a meeting they called to discuss a ban on federal funding for NPR programming, setting up a vote on the proposal by the full House of Representatives on Thursday.

WASHINGTON — House Republicans stepped up pressure on National Public Radio on Wednesday at a meeting they called to discuss a ban on federal funding for NPR programming, setting up a vote on the proposal by the full House of Representatives today.

"Taxpayers should not be on the hook for something that is widely available in the private market," Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colo., author of the bill, said in a statement. "I wish only the best for NPR. Like many Americans, I enjoy much of their programming."

Democrats largely oppose the Republicans' House bill and say NPR is a valuable resource, especially in rural areas.

The legislation, which was fast-tracked by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and GOP leadership, does not cut any money from the federal budget. Rather, it prohibits NPR and its local affiliates from using federal dollars to produce programming or purchase content from other member stations.

NPR's member stations receive an average of about 10 percent of their funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which received $430 million in federal funding for fiscal 2011. Executives at NPR have said that without federal money, some stations in smaller communities, where donations are harder to attract, could go dark.