Republican candidates for county commissioner held onto leads overnight to fill all open posts on the three-person board.

Republican candidates for county commissioner held onto leads overnight to fill all open posts on the three-person board.

Republican Don Skundrick captured 36,297 votes, 57.6 percent of the total, to best Democrat Jeff Golden, who garnered 26,655 votes, or 42.3 percent of the total.

Republican John Rachor got 34,291 votes, or 55.4 percent, coming out ahead of Democrat Mark Wisnovsky, who got 27,496 votes, or 44.43 percent of the total.

Both Republicans said they are ready to dive into the business of running the county, instead of a campaign.

"It takes a little while to come down after this," Skundrick said. "You work so hard on the campaign, then there's the adrenaline rush of winning, but if I didn't think I could do the work, I wouldn't have run. Fortunately, I'm used to hard work."

He said training sessions with Commissioner C.W. Smith and County Adminstrator Danny Jordan are planned to help the newly elected commissioners learn about county policies and procedures. Skundrick and his wife plan a vacation, then, he said he will be ready to hit the ground running when he takes office in January.

His opponent Golden conceded late Tuesday, after a second round of preliminary results.

"Don is a capable guy," Golden said, adding that he hopes county leaders will take a strong role in making the community strong and self-reliant.

Golden said he plans to take a break, then find a role where he can continue seeking solutions to issues that concern him.

Rachor, who was out collecting campaign signs this morning, said he plans to "hit it hard" as he steps into a his new role.

"If you race boats or cars and you win, you get to go have a beer," he joked. "If you win this race, you have to go to work."

Rachor's opponent Wisnovsky said he was proud of the positive communication between the candidates and voters. He hoped that his campaign had demonstrated that working people with families can be involved in local politics and might encourage others to get involved in the community, something he plans to continue.

— Anita Burke