Eight weeks after their son went missing, the parents of Kyron Horman said Friday they have no idea where the second-grader might be, no evidence that he's dead and no indication somebody was holding him.

TIGARD — Eight weeks after their son went missing, the parents of Kyron Horman said Friday they have no idea where the second-grader might be, no evidence that he's dead and no indication somebody was holding him.

Kaine Horman and Desiree Young held another news conference in their drive to keep the spotlight on the 7-year-old who vanished from his school June 4.

Despite national media attention, a $50,000 reward and the divorced couple's confidence in the small army of investigators searching for their son, nothing has turned up.

"We don't know where he is, and we need to keep looking," Kaine Horman said.

He and Young both believe Kyron is alive.

"I just have a feeling that somebody's holding him," Young said. "I don't know if I can elaborate other than that. It's just a feeling."

The couple were cautious when answering questions about Terri Horman, the stepmother of the boy whom Kaine Horman is divorcing.

Young again said she believes Terri Horman was involved in the disappearance. However, Terri Horman has not been named as a suspect by investigators and she has said almost nothing publicly since Kyron vanished.

She was the last person known to have seen the boy.

Kaine Horman filed for divorce in late June after he said he was told by investigators that Terri Horman had tried to hire someone to kill him.

She is reportedly living with her family in southern Oregon after Kaine Horman won a restraining order against her. Peter Bunch, her attorney in the divorce, has submitted court documents saying she would not contest the divorce.

Efforts by The Associated Press to reach Terri Horman have been unsuccessful. Stephen Houze, another attorney who represents her, said his client was being subjected to a "witch hunt" and a "media frenzy" and that she has received threats.

Kaine Horman and Young said they have been briefed every day or two by law enforcement officers about the search for their son.

Young became emotional and fought back tears.

"I don't know if I'm getting through it. I'm just taking one day at a time," she said. "Eight weeks is a hard marker for me."