Net Summary

PORTLAND — Oregon Trout and Oregon Water Trust announced a name change to The Freshwater Trust. Fresh off a merge in the fall of 2008, the two organizations are now two of four programs under The Freshwater Trust umbrella. The other two programs are Healthy Waters Institute and StreamBank.

"Our new name and logo align with the work that we have been doing and the work that we will be doing," said Joe Whitworth, president of The Freshwater Trust. Founded in 1983 by a group of flyfishing conservationists, Oregon Trout works to protect and restore native fish and their ecosystems.

Founded in 1993 as the nation's first water trust, Oregon Water Trust works cooperatively with landowners to keep more water in their rivers and streams.

"While we will remain true to both organizations' original missions, the merge and name change will allow The Freshwater Trust to address stream form, flow and function at the same time," said Whitworth. "This creates a more effective, one-stop shop approach to river and stream restoration."

The Freshwater Trust's other two programs - Healthy Waters Institute and StreamBank - further add to this integrated restoration approach. Launched in 2005, Healthy Waters Institute gets students out of the classroom and connects them to the natural world, in hopes that they will protect tomorrow what is restored today.

StreamBank is a web-based tool that assists local restoration professionals and landowners in navigating through the complex systems of restoration funding and permitting - two major culprits that slow the restoration process.

"We believe the four programs of The Freshwater Trust position us to help address Oregon's mounting freshwater challenges," said Whitworth.

About us

The Freshwater Trust (formerly Oregon Trout and Oregon Water Trust) is a statewide not-for-profit organization headquartered in Portland, Oregon with satellite offices in Bend and Corvallis. The Freshwater Trust takes an integrated, innovative approach to restoring freshwater ecosystems - from restoring a river's architecture to working with landowners to keep more water in streams to educating children on the importance of freshwater conservation.