Former public radio talk show host Jeff Golden is striking out on his own &

with an interactive Ashland-based Webcast called Immense Possibilities Radio.




As his own boss, Golden says he can openly advocate for a sustainable environment and economy, avoid "divisive, red meat issues" and be free "to be more open-ended, to welcome listeners as co-creators of the program, to take more chances and be more interested in what happens spontaneously."




Golden, an author and former Jackson County commissioner, hosted Jefferson Exchange for 10 years on Jefferson Public Radio, leaving the show last June to explore a run for the U.S. Senate. He didn't run, and JPR didn't take him back.




His IPR show is Webcast live with video on Equilibrium Television (), operated by Mobius Productions. The studio is housed at The Mobius, which now occupies the old Mojo Rising space on Lithia Way. It also airs on Ashland Home Net, which carries Ashland Fiber Network.




With three state-of-the-art Sony digital television cameras pointed at him &

and his laptop tapped into the Internet &

Golden kicked off his show with an interview with noted author Frances Moore Lapp&

233;. The two covered such issues as ending hunger, overcoming the fear and isolation of modern society and creating "living democracy," where everyone participates in finding solutions for the common good.




Questions appeared in Golden's e-mail box, including ones from Sharif M. Abdullah of Portland, who asked where people can find the political will for positive change, and Lane County Commissioner Pete Sorenson, who asked how to overcome world hunger.




Golden goes beyond the role of interviewer, joining with the guest in a conversation. With Lapp&

233;, he said, "People feel economically insecure. They're running as hard as they can to stay in place and every month they feel booked to the max in a vicious cycle."




Discussing how the media ridicule hopeful change, Golden said people operate with the belief that society "may not be perfect but it's the only way to do it."




The solution, the pair said, is to operate on the buddy system, finding fellowship as people work toward "heart-centered realism."




After exploring the Senate run, Golden said his belief was confirmed that it's impossible to elect "the right candidate who's going to fix everything." His challenge in hosting a participative, visionary Webcast show is "to shine the light on a lot of possibility," he said.




Golden added, "The world's changing fast. We'll see if dynamic people come to IPR. This show is not meant to push anyone to any point of view or any candidate. It's an advocacy show, advocating for involvement and a chance to enrich our lives."




IPR's motto is based on a quote by the late Howard Thurman: "Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and do it, because what the world needs is people who come alive."




The show is in a three-month pilot phase. Listeners may get on an e-mail update list for the next Webcast by e-mailing ipr@opendoor.net.