Tim Wakefield learned the hard way not to try to sneak a knuckleball by Barry Bonds.




Bonds hit his 748th career homer in Boston's 9-5 victory over the Giants on Sunday, adding Fenway Park, the Red Sox and Wakefield to his scrapbook and moving within seven of Hank Aaron's mark.




Bonds had been hitless in eight at-bats against Wakefield, even joking that the pitches were too slow to hit hard.




"I think my age got me slower so I'm more able to time it a bit better," Bonds said with a smile after going 2-for-3 on Sunday. "I tip my cap to him, he came after me in every at-bat. He gave me something to hit."




The last time Bonds homered off a knuckler was when he hit No. 73 of 2001 off Los Angeles Dodger Dennis Springer to establish the single-season record.




But his sixth-inning solo shot merely cut Boston's lead to 8-4, and Manny Ramirez padded the lead with his second homer in as many games. Ramirez was 2-for-4 with three RBIs, David Ortiz had a pair of doubles, and Wakefield (7-7) pitched well before faltering in the sixth to help the Red Sox complete the three-game sweep.




"I was fortunate enough to pitch to him where a home run didn't bother us too much," said Wakefield, who allowed five runs and eight hits with a walk, striking out three in 5 2-3 innings. "It's great to walk away from this homestand 4-2. To sweep San Francisco was special."




The lifetime National Leaguer, a seven-time MVP, has now homered in 36 ballparks, adding Fenway to the list in his third game at the ballpark that was the first home of the first man to top 700 homers.




Bonds passed Babe Ruth and his 714 total last year, and resumed his pursuit of Aaron's 755 with 11 homers in his first 76 at-bats this year; but he has just three in 91 at-bats since.




"It was never gone," Bonds said of his home run stroke. "It's the person. It's me. Sometimes you just don't have it. Sometimes you do."




Bonds and Wakefield were teammates with Pittsburgh in 1992.




"When we were in Pittsburgh, we loved him," Bonds said. "We're both in our 40s now, and he's still good."