Here in Florence we are celebrating our 100th annual Rhododendron Festival, which means the carnival is in town. Over the years, I have a established a basic rule of thumb when it comes to carnival rides: If the person running a ride, such as the Squirrel Cages, keeps a garden hose available for spraying out the seats, I stay away. That's because this person's sole ambition is to make me &

and others like me &

vomit. I realize this person may be a trained professional who, on a daily basis, makes countless split-second decisions on whether to push the red or green button to stop the ride. And, yes, I realize this individual has nothing but the safety of his passengers in mind when he secures a safety latch by removing his boot and whacking it until his arm gets tired, at which point, being a trained professional, he bolsters the confidence of his nervous riders by hacking up a cheekful of phlegm and shrugging his shoulders before walking off.




Yet somehow, in spite of these assurances, I'm still terrified of carnival rides. I think it's because, when I was 10, my "friends" talked me into riding The Drop Out, which wasn't actually a ride as much as it was a barf-a-torium with an observation deck. Basically, 30 people entered a circular room and found a spot along the wall. Gradually, the walls would begin to rotate faster and faster, creating enough centrifugal force to suck the cotton candy from the mouth of anyone standing within 100 feet. Once the ride reached optimum centrifuge, occupants would be stuck to the wall as the floor dropped out, leaving them suspended 20 feet above a pit of (presumably fake) spikes.




All of this was visible through a series of windows surrounding the ride so that, while waiting in line, people such as myself could prepare for the experience by, very slowly, having a bowel movement. I still don't know how I got talked into this ride. All I know is I ended up next to someone whose stomach contents went on display the instant the floor dropped out. Due to the force of gravity, I couldn't move my head without blacking out, which meant watching the sum total of this person's food consumption &

which was considerable &

reconfigure itself on the wall next to me.




This was, without question, the longest ride of my life. To this day, I can still see the apologetic look on that person's face as the ride came to an end and the three of us &

him, his vomit and I &

gradually slid down the wall together.




Since that fateful encounter I've had no interest in being strapped down, cinched up or buckled into something specifically designed to do things that normally require a flight suit. The one time I let myself get talked into riding something other than the merry-go-round was in high school, when I tried impressing my date by joining her in the Squirrel Cages. Everything was fine until that part in the ride where &

and you know the part I mean &

it starts to actually move.




Granted, I'm not a professional carnival ride operator, but I think I could recognize some of the subtle signs exhibited by a rider who is in distress. For example: Someone who is pressed so hard against the cage that his lips are actually outside the door while screaming "LET-ME-OFF-LET-ME-OFF-LET-ME-OFF!" would be a red flag to me. Particularly if the rider in question began doing this after traveling a distance of less than two feet. In my case, these signs were somehow missed by our ride operator. I'm not saying it was all his fault.




Who knows, he might've been busy looking for a garden hose.




You can write to at the Siuslaw News at P.O. Box 10, Florence, OR. 97439, or visit his website at /blog/