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DailyTidings.com
  • Write-in candidates earn spot on November ballot

  • Two write-in candidates received enough votes in the Jackson County primary election to appear on the ballot in the November general election, according to Jackson County Clerk Chris Walker.
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  • Two write-in candidates received enough votes in the Jackson County primary election to appear on the ballot in the November general election, according to Jackson County Clerk Chris Walker.
    The candidates still have to officially accept the nominations, which come from the state rather than the Jackson County clerk's office, Walker said.
    A 25-year-old Rogue Valley native, Nick Card, received 475 votes for House District 5 representative. He announced in a release today that he plans to accept the Republican nomination and run against incumbent state Rep. Peter Buckley in November.
    Tonia Moro will run against Republican nominee Rick Dyer, owner of Northwest Energy Solutions, for the Jackson County Board of Commissioners. Moro, a lawyer who lives near Talent, mounted a successful late write-in campaign in the Democratic primary for Position 1 after no other Democrats filed to run for commission seats.
    Two Republican nominees, Colleen Roberts and Sal Esquivel, also received enough write-in votes to receive the Democratic nomination.
    Roberts, owner of the Sensational Sweets bakery in Eagle Point, was nominated on the Republican side for Jackson County Commissioner, Position 3. In House District 6, incumbent Esquivel ran unopposed in the Republican primary and no Democrats filed to run for the seat.
    If Roberts and Esquivel accept their nominations, they will have to choose whether they appear on the ballot in the November general election as a Republican or a Democrat candidate.
    "Even though they garnered that nomination, they can only appear on the ballot once," Walker said. "So they will have to choose."
    While only two write-in candidates received enough votes to appear on the ballot in the November general election, Walker said write-in votes are extremely common.
    "There are always hundreds and hundreds of write-in votes," Walker said. "For example, there are 10 pages of people listed as write-in candidates for the Board of Commissioners Position 1 alone."
    — Kelsey Thomas
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