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DailyTidings.com
  • California's gun-buying capital

    Shasta County gun culture has endured, even thrived, despite state restrictions
  • REDDING, Calif. — Imagine plopping a dark-red Texas county deep in the heart of California and forcing the Texans to abide by tough gun laws. They might learn to live with them. But they're not going to like 'em.
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  • REDDING, Calif. — Imagine plopping a dark-red Texas county deep in the heart of California and forcing the Texans to abide by tough gun laws. They might learn to live with them. But they're not going to like 'em.
    Just ask the residents of Shasta County, the gun-buying capital of the Golden State. It's a place where the public firing range on a sunny weekend day seems as crowded as a San Francisco Bay Area Apple Store; the sheriff has doled out 12 times as many concealed-weapon permits as there are in Los Angeles County; and one of the county seat's top elected officials owns one of the area's biggest gun stores.
    "We like shooting," said Redding Vice Mayor Patrick Henry Jones, whose family-owned shop sells about 250 guns a month. "It's just normal up here."
    As part of deep-blue California, Shasta County could be a window into gun-loving America's future. That's because residents here already live with many of the same gun controls that polls show most Americans believe should be imposed nationwide after mass shootings such as those in Aurora, Colo., and Newtown, Conn.
    California has banned "assault weapons" since 1989. It has required background checks on all gun sales since 1991. And it has outlawed ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 bullets since 2000.
    Whether or not they need, or even want, assault weapons and large-capacity magazines isn't really the point, many Shasta residents say.
    "They don't like being told by government entities that they can't own a certain thing," said Rich Howell, general manager of Redding's Olde West pawnshop and gun store, where ducks, heads of bucks, pictures of bucking broncos and racks upon racks of long guns adorn the walls.
    But Howell and others concede the county's gun culture has endured, even thrived, despite the restrictions — at least so far.
    Still, the talk in Washington, D.C., and Sacramento of more gun laws has sent firearms and ammunition flying off the shelves at the vice mayor's gun store. He's buying back AR-15-type semi-automatic rifles — at least those that aren't already banned under the state's assault weapons law — at twice the price he sold them just a few months ago, knowing that he can charge customers even more because manufacturers can't make them fast enough.
    The deep gun divide between urban and rural America is as clear in Redding as the snow-capped peaks visible from downtown. Nestled along Interstate 5 between Sacramento and Oregon amid some of the state's most rugged forests, Redding is heavily white, Republican and working-class. Only three hours from the liberal, ethnically diverse and generally upscale Bay Area, it's a world away.
    Candy Shelly understands both sides of the cultural chasm. For most of her life, she never considered owning a firearm. But after running a gift shop in Santa Barbara, she moved to Redding six years ago to retire. Living alone at age 67, she was recently spooked when her dog started barking as if someone were lurking outside.
    So she found herself at Jones' Fort to buy a five-shot, .32-caliber revolver.
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