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DailyTidings.com
  • Urban chickens

    Backyard poultry making a comeback
  • ATLANTA — A sign on the fence in Anne-Marie Anderson's Decatur, Ga., home reads: "Beware of Chickens." Walk in and Anderson's 18 birds roam freely, digging among the fallen leaves. They squawk and flap their wings to cross a stream. Glenda, one of the bigger chickens, waddles straight through the water.
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  • ATLANTA — A sign on the fence in Anne-Marie Anderson's Decatur, Ga., home reads: "Beware of Chickens." Walk in and Anderson's 18 birds roam freely, digging among the fallen leaves. They squawk and flap their wings to cross a stream. Glenda, one of the bigger chickens, waddles straight through the water.
    "Here, here chick-chicks," Anderson clucks in a British accent, doling out food.
    "It's very nice to hang out with a cup of coffee and watch the chickens running around clucking. They exude general contentment."
    Anderson and her family are among the growing number of city dwellers nationwide who keep chickens in their backyards.
    In Atlanta, more than 2,000 "backyard poultry buffs" have joined the city's Backyard Poultry Meetup, a group that plans monthly meetings for conversations with "eggsperts."
    Whether it is for their children's enjoyment or for a healthier food source, more and more urbanites have decided to color their backyards with the wild feathers of their winged pets, causing many cities to rework their ordinances.
    Cobb County, Ga., boasts its own Backyard Chicken Alliance.
    Decatur and Alpharetta, Ga., have adjusted laws to allow for backyard chickens. Cobb loosened its restrictions in February, allowing the fowl on lots of less than 2 acres, the former minimum needed, if owners apply for variances.
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