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DailyTidings.com
  • Who Am I?

  • We're much more than solitary beings; much more than we think we are. As in myths or the stories in sacred scriptures, the details of our personal struggles and archetypal journeys lay the foundations of worldwide transmutation, each stone absolutely vital and central to building the entire tabernacle. So we are inextricably intertwined, melded together, a sacred relationship in oneness, divine oneness as many.
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  • We're much more than solitary beings; much more than we think we are. As in myths or the stories in sacred scriptures, the details of our personal struggles and archetypal journeys lay the foundations of worldwide transmutation, each stone absolutely vital and central to building the entire tabernacle. So we are inextricably intertwined, melded together, a sacred relationship in oneness, divine oneness as many.
    Who am I? One infinite being, an all-encompassing all-love, who adopts the seeming limits of forms and enters into this earthly sense of many lives competing, where "failures and shortcomings" really are grist for the mill. They are kings masquerading as beggars, blessings that appear as curses, and what seems to us mundane, problematic, "evil," disguises the holy.
    We are the relation of God to itself in ever present love. The experience of this world creates the necessity to love and be loved, or "wither and die." With all the paradoxes and dichotomies, with all the steps forward and back, the truth is this: We are spiraling up into sacred relationships within our oneness, within our oneness as God. This thorny, sometimes horrible world necessitates the overcoming of our problems. In the end, when all human attempts fail, it turns us to God. When we awake to the reality of God's omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient love, it solves the unsolvable. And the whole arc of this experience is the perfect engine of God's expanding into ever greater love.
    So we are driven to take up the impossible work of reconciliation unto love, with all people and all things, to return to our true self. A difficulty calls us to sit down and meditate, not to change the picture, not to do anything to it, but to reestablish ourselves in God, in the reality that God is an infinite all-love, the one, the only; there is no "other." This "problem," this "upsetting person," these "awful people," are here to help me meet my self, my neighbor, my God, all one.
    We work to embrace reconciliation unto love: We work to let God live its life as us. We work to let God take over, so that all things are made new and we can right our wrongs, make peace even when it's the other who is not at peace with us, pray for the ones we are in conflict with, and outwardly and in our hearts do everything possible to bring harmony and peace to all our relationships. Most important of all, we stay with an unresolved issue, and don't stop, sometimes continuing in secret for weeks, or months, or years, until we can love with the love with which God loves us, and there is no one left but our beloved one.
    Then that relationship problem, as it comes to mind in our meditation, translates to, and acts as, the spiritual principle with which we work (for example: I and my father are one, and so is my brother, my neighbor, my enemy: there is no "other"). It translates to the principle we stay with, until we are lifted up, and see that the so-called problem is not a problem, but instead, is our teacher.
    If hearing this calls up longings unspoken, longings unanswered, if this is a "yes" in your heart, then perhaps this approach will be helpful. In any case, if you follow your inner Spirit, you will find your own way.
    You deep moving glorious
    Bring home the boat
    that carries us
    "Really Being With You" is Ross' book and KSKQ program. See mosheross.wordpress.com.
    Send 600- to 700-word articles on all aspects of Inner Peace to Sally McKirgan at innerpeaceforyou@live.com.
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